Parish of St. Clement
Honolulu, Hawaii

In February (2006) we spent two rainy weeks in Hawaii, installing a polymer concrete labyrinth for the Parish of St.Clement, in Honolulu. Our newsletter (Circles #13) described the visit like this:

Our first installation of the year was in Honolulu, at The Parish of St. Clement. Our time away from home stretched to 16 days as we dodged unfavorable weather (rain). Our visit left me with a number of impressions, especially the spirit of Aloha. The South Pacific and Asian influences make Hawaii a wonderful cultural mix, including, of course, those who are native to these islands.

The Hawaiian language has the usual five vowels, but only seven consonants: h, k, l, m, n, p, and w. Plus the okina (') which looks like an apostrophe but results in a glottal stop, as when saying "oh - oh." So, "Hawai'i" is not like the mainlander's "huh-WHY-eeeee." It's more like "ha-WHAH (stop) ee" (short "ee" sound). Given the shortened alphabet, all the street names seem alike, full of k's and l's with three or four vowels in a row. Businessmen wear colorful patterned shirts rather than suits or ties. Life is slower -- especially the traffic. Gridlock is constant and problematic in Honolulu, but most folks seem to take it in stride. Japanese tourists dominate in the haute couture stores. Barefoot bronze surfers ride bicycles with surfboards tied to the sides. In Waikiki, restaurants are packed, and expensive. Soaring real estate values have left the skyline filled with building cranes. A drive of 15 minutes takes you into the rainforest where it can rain several inches in an hour. Weather programs report the height of the surf, which varies depending on the season and the trade winds. I can see why people are drawn here. Our weeks here were cold and wet, with lots of hard work. But in the evening, seafood restaurants abound -- my favorite. We hope to return to do work on some of the other islands in the future.

Our concrete technique is explained in numerous places on this website. This is another example. (See polymer.html or polymerConcrete.pdf).

Here are some additional photos:

Acid washing the concrete.
Marking out the labryses.
On the town for dinner.
Close up of cut lines.
Robert on crutches.
Finished labyrinth.

Our tools and techniques are proprietary. We are the only labyrinth artists who offer this particular type of all-concrete labyrinth. It is durable, low-maintenance, and very striking. Plus, being concrete, it is cost effective.

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Click on the following photos for a larger view and more details.

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